Ad

Friday, July 29, 2011

Curbed: The Flats at Atlas District Go Up

Arboretum-Rendering-2
Rendering courtesy of Clark Realty Capital

Curbed provides an update on construction at the Flats at Atlas District, which really are coming along quite nicely. The project is going on the old Sears site (behind Hechinger Mall).

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

Is that a parking garage on the left sife of site (standing facing to the structure on Bladenburg Road? I am talking about the boxy concrete structure without any windows. Couldn't they come up with a better design for that? I thought the era of ugly new sturctures in DC was over!

erin606 said...

Very excited for this project. Does anyone know what is currently going on in Hechinger Mall behind the Safeway? Not sure if it's the Ross that is (allegedly) coming soon or if it was the Aldi construction starting. Also, any more info on the Bible Faith Church at 14th and Maryland? It's great seeing the Starburst intersection get a little love, it really needs it.

Kenny G said...

@2:29:00:

Yes, that the windowless cinderblock wall is a bit jarring. I am assuming that the cinderblock will be bricked over and eventually softened by some foliage.

Anonymous said...

@erin606

Pretty sure that's the Aldi's on 17th behind the Safeway, which is going up really fast. Also going up really fast is the Ross on the Benning Road side. I was glad to see they repaved the entire lot, put in new lights, and are completely revamping the entire facade.

Benning Road & Bladensburg Road are really starting to pop.

Rosedale Representing said...

You guys are ridiculous. Come walk around Rosedale/Kingman Park and see how scary it *really* is.

The playgrounds! Oh no! The kids on the sidewalk! OMG! The crossing guards helping them to Miner Elementary! What's next! Neighbors hanging out together, both black and white. HOW IS THIS POSSIBLE?!

It isn't 1990. You're embarrassing yourself.

Rosedale Representing said...

Oops, wrong thread.

Gonzo said...

Does anyone have any more info on the Aldi? What's the timeline on opening?

dt said...

anon@2:29, kenny g:

I think that windowless cinderblock wall is actually an interior wall and they will build more structure out from that to the sidewalk. Notice the doors from the stairs and elevators open outward into currently empty space.

Anonymous said...

Am I the only one who is shocked they are building the apt portion out of wood? Isnt sound going to travel through the floors? I thought large apt buildings like this HAD to be concrete poured in order to soundproof all the footsteps and other noise properly. Am I missing something?

ro said...

Not sure what the building codes say, but it's not terribly uncommon to see a multistory building in this city framed with wood. I think most of the preconceived notions about sound, fire safety, stability are addressed in the architectural design. It really has to do more with the connection points rather than the wood beams themseleves.

Anonymous said...

@ro

Yep, very common here in DC (and elsewhere). Anything 5 stories or under is likely to be stick-built. This includes the new apartments at Rhode Island Metro, the Giant at 3rd & H, Avalon Bay at 4th & I, etc.

Some of those have concrete for the first story for big open retail bays, but from a structural standpoint wood framing is fine for several stories of residential because there are lots of intermediate walls for support.

Not in Rosedale said...

I <3 you, Rosedale Representing.

BB said...

@anon 5:32

There are quite a few building techniques and materials that can be used for soundproofing that are actually more effective, cheaper and use a much smaller foot print then using the brute force tactic of cinder block construction. Resilient Channels, "Green Glue" and even double layers of drywall in combination with each other or even on their own and be surprisingly effective. What causes noise issues between the interior walls of a structure is the vibration of the sound waves reverberating through the structure of the walls. If you limit the number of contact points and create a gap between the interior frame of the structure and the drywall of the rooms you can eliminate nearly all sound from transferring from one room to another. Many of these techniques can even be retrofitted into existing structures.

Anonymous said...

OMG!!! We need an emergency rally to protest the use of wood in this structure so we can save those future residents from their neighbors. We must interfere! If not us, then who?! We must be the vanguards today, to save this neighborhood from tomorrow! For only we can count on ourselves to dictate the right path! Say no to wood! Say yes to righteousness!

H Street Landlord said...

Looking good. Glad it's coming together so quickly.

big green cat said...

11:37,
your sarcasm is funny. but America is building worse buildings that it should. standards for mixed use and multifamily dwellings should be higher. stick construction is not up to par.

andrew said...

Yes, but concrete/steel is WAY more expensive. Although I'm all for building things to last, it's also important that people are able to afford to live in these new residences.

Most new construction in DC has been outlandishly priced. I'm still not entirely sure what sort of person is able to justify the cost of living at Constitution Square or the (very ugly and very expensive) Loree Grand.

Nard Dawg said...

sometimes I wonder whether there is anything at all that FT readers dont know about and wont comment on. That old saying about opinions being like noses is so true. geez

Anonymous said...

My rent at the Loree Grand is exceptionally low, but I got a deal. I could not afford to live elsehwere and was priced out of my old neighborhood (Columbia Heights). Not sure who in my building pays full price.